The Association for the Promotion of Women in Romania opposes legalized prostitution, as they view prostitution as "another form of violence against women and girls".

The legality of prostitution in Europe varies by country.

Some countries outlaw the act of engaging in sexual activity in exchange for money, while others allow prostitution itself, but not most forms of procuring (such as operating brothels, facilitating the prostitution of another, deriving financial gain from the prostitution of another, soliciting/loitering).

Germany is listed by the UNODC as one of the most common destinations for victims of human trafficking. (It has been legalized and regulated by the government since 1999.) Under the law, prostitutes are basically professionals who engage in sexual activities in exchange for money.

The government allows this activity as long as they pay taxes and keep legal documents.

Prostitution is an administrative, but not criminal offence in Russia (such as, for example, drinking beer in a public place or walking nude on the street).

The maximum punishment is a fine up to 2000 rubles (~); however, organizing prostitution or engaging somebody into prostitution is punishable by a prison term.

It is widespread in Prague and areas near the Republic's western borders with Germany and Austria.

In 2002, the Czech Statistical Bureau estimated the trade to be worth six billion Czech koruna (7 million) a year. In 2002, the government changed the law in an effort to improve the legal situation of prostitutes.

Activities which are subject to the prostitution laws include: selling and buying sexual services, soliciting in public places, running brothels, deriving financial gain from the prostitution of another, offering premises to be used for prostitution etc.