And then there was moments with him where like we would be in Harlem. It doesn't necessarily have to be love but it's just about opening up and saying yes. Seeing what's there that might bring you your highest happiness.

I was like, 'Wow, that's deep.' It's really simple: I don't fit their picture. I've been dating black men for really, for like, I don't know, 10 years. That could be anything from religion to class to even like a job.

I was like, 'Wow, that's deep.' It's really simple: I don't fit their picture.

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("Some of us just have to work harder to stay in the game," she says of the male-dominated industry.) While Kenya's professional life is precisely on track (she's thisclose to making partner), her love life is suffering a severe drought. Sanaa is finally forced out of her comfort zone when she meets Brian (Simon Baker), an attractive, single white blond-haired, blue-eyed landscape architect who throws her life into flux when sparks begin to fly on their blind date.

She hasn't had a date in two years, and any prospective male quickly loses points if he fails to meet the criteria on her "list," a set of characteristics she requires from her potential partner. The film focuses on a young black woman dealing with the aspect of an interracial relationship from all sides as friends and family would rather her find her own "IBM" ("Ideal Black Man"), society still isn't quite as accepting as it should be and Kenya herself struggles to come to terms with her own innate biases.

But the only thing worse than alluding to Black male school dropout and incarceration rates as reasons individual Black women can’t find chemistry on the dating scene, is stating that Black women entertain interracial dating as a virtual last-ditch option to avoid dying alone. At some point we need to stop looking for easy societal answers to why we can’t find love with other people (when folks all around us are doing it), and we need to start investigating the far tougher issue about what we personally can do to help aid our search for the compatible person.

It actually disgusts me when people proffer interracial dating as a marriage solution for Black women because it dehumanizes men of other races, while ignoring individual Black women’s specific tastes in men. Hell, that’s advice that Black women should heed just as much as educated, well-traveled Black men like Terrell Starr.

You know the thing is I wouldn't have said I was closed before, but like, it's the kind of thing that you don't even think of other options. I think it's very universal in that, first of all, it's a love story at the core. It's about, you know, that life may bring you something that didn't fit what you thought.

When "Hustle & Flow" producer Stephanie Allain ran across a newspaper article that reported 42.4 percent of successful black women have never been married, a reality she had seen reflected in her own life, she knew she had to take the story to the big screen.

Lathan: I've been in a couple with different races like Latino, white, Middle Eastern. Lathan: People are going to always have their opinions whether you date a black man or not. And, it's almost acceptable within our culture to be prejudiced toward whites because of our history. Because you know the inspiration for this movie was this Newsweek article that came out a couple of years ago that talks about 42.4 percent of black women in America aren't married. It doesn't necessarily have to be love but it's just about opening up and saying yes. Seeing what's there that might bring you your highest happiness.

AP: Did you find any major differences between the cultures? I've had girlfriends, family members comment on black men that I've dated as well as white people. And if anybody doesn't fit that picture they're going to be like, 'Yeah, I didn't see you with him.' I remember after I dated this white man, nobody said anything but there was a couple of men in my family that joked after that. Hee hee hee.' And, you know, they laughed, and it was like light and a joke. Black women are shooting up the corporate ladder way faster than our black male counterparts.

And I identify with this character and I know that this is a character we haven't really seen on screen before. Because you know the inspiration for this movie was this Newsweek article that came out a couple of years ago that talks about 42.4 percent of black women in America aren't married.

We have not seen an interracial issue dealt with from a black woman and white man's perspective in this way. I loved the fact that it wasn't about the couple being against the world or the couple against the family. Black women are shooting up the corporate ladder way faster than our black male counterparts.

When I read Ukoha’s article, the one thing that could possibly be true from a general perspective was the part she summarily dismissed: Jacque Reid may in fact be too busy to date, which is something that many Black professionals can probably attest to.