S.-born Muslims of diverse ethnicities, immigrants from many countries and regions, and converts from various backgrounds.Many Muslim women, although by no means all, practice hijab in accordance with their religious beliefs: these women may wear a headscarf, also known as hijab or khimar, and loose-fitting clothing when they are in public and when they are in the presence of men who are not part of their immediate family.

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No one has put a gun to their head.” Typical too are the comments made by the founder of a conservative legal organization, which has represented Christians and Jews who wanted Saturdays or Sundays off to worship, that “[t]he problem with the Muslim prayer request is that it’s not one day or annual . In a pending lawsuit, for example, two Hertz employees claim that the company discriminated against , No. The timing of the added break will fluctuate during the year to coordinate with the religious timing for Muslim prayers. A security company hired a Muslim woman as a part-time security officer who wore at her interview a religious garment that covered her from head to toe, revealing only her hands and face.

The employer, a hospital, had always accommodated a Muslim employee’s prayer schedule, allowing her to take breaks during the work day to pray in its two non-denominational chapels. The company’s written uniform policy states in all capital letters that “ADDITIONS TO THE UNIFORM ARE NOT PERMITTED FOR ANY REASON INCLUDING RELIGION.” Hence, when the employee showed up for her first assignment wearing a khimar she was told that as an accommodation she could wear a baseball cap to cover her head, but could not wear her , No.

Numerous sources of law protect these rights (see below). Constitution bar federal and state governments from making laws or rules that specifically prohibit women from practicing hijab.

These rights protect Muslim women's right to participate equally in society, whether at work, at school, at the DMV or other government offices, in the criminal justice system, or in public places. In some circumstances, however, the Constitution allows neutral rules that apply to everyone, such as a rule barring all headcoverings, whether religious or not.

An obstacle for Muslims working in meat processing plants is the Quran’s prohibition of the consumption of pork. When he had work performance problems he was transferred to the pork production line, where he could be closely supervised. The owner, who apparently believed that plaintiff’s Islamic garb was at odds with the expectations of his sushi and hibachi consuming customers, rejected her request and terminated her.

Many Muslims also believe that even touching pork violates this tenet of Islam, the accommodation of which was recently tested in , in which the EEOC alleged that in order to be referred for work at meat processing facilities applicants were required to sign a form stating that they would not refuse to handle pork in the course of their jobs. He objected to the transfer, but didn’t tell management that his reluctance to work on the pork production line was based on his religious beliefs.

Muslim employees seeking accommodations to wear hajibs, to set aside time or space for daily prayer, or to perform ablutions before prayers; or, in meatpacking plants, to abstain from handling pork, often meet with antagonism from employers and co-workers. We will briefly examine the post-9/11 history of workplace accommodations of Islamic religious customs., or headscarf, is for many Muslim females a visible expression of their faith, piety or modesty, and represents a tangible manifestation of their religious identity.

Employers often do not see headscarves in the same light, and relying on uniform dress codes, their desire to maintain their corporate image, or the nebulous concept of “customer preference,” have over the years objected to wearing traditional Islamic head coverings at work.

Some women additionally cover much of their face with a covering known as niqab.