It seems people might only be able to determine the extremes of a personality from a photo, rather than its nuances.

(One study found that the owner of an "honest" face is not any more likely to be trustworthy, for example.)It’s true that attractive people generally are treated more nicely by others, and they might have better-adjusted personalities as a result. In relationships, personality eventually overtakes attractiveness—or at the very least, we tend to find people more attractive when we think they have good personalities.

She launched Face Mate in 2011, drawing on her opinion that people in happy relationships tend to resemble each other.

Hockey players with wider faces, considered a sign of aggression, spend more time in the penalty box.

It takes longer, more meaningful interactions, however, to pinpoint other traits, like if the prospective mate is open, agreeable, or neurotic.

"Online, this might result in males restricting their potential mates.”is two decades old, but new, fast-growing apps such as Tinder have shifted the online-matching emphasis back to looks.

Tinder dispenses with the idea that it takes a mutual love of pho or Fleet Foxes to create a spark; instead, users of the phone app swipe through the photos of potential mates and message the ones they like.

”(Sure, but I mean, who would want an ugly, broke jerk sticking faithfully by their side?

)Royzman said that among his students (not in a clinical condition), men tend to spend much more on physical attractiveness, and women spend more on social attractiveness traits like kindness and intelligence.

Men and women make mating decisions very differently, he speculates.

Men tend to act like single-issue voters: If a prospect is not attractive enough, he or she usually doesn’t qualify for a first date, period.

Edward Royzman, a psychology professor at the University of Pennsylvania, asks me to list four qualities on a piece of paper: physical attractiveness, income, kindness, and fidelity.

Then he gives me 200 virtual “date points” that I’m to distribute among the four traits.

Most people end up with someone who’s about as good-looking as they are.“People might prefer attractive people, but they often end up pairing off with people who are similar in attractiveness,” Leslie Zebrowitz, a psychology professor at Brandeis University and an expert on face perception, said.