The offender must also be aware that the course of conduct they are pursuing would cause the victim to be alarmed or distressed.The above is for harassment without fear of violence.For example, your neighbor may start calling in noise complaints to the police directed at your property.

Harassment is a serious issue, and though we might expect it on the street or even at work, it often blindsides us when we are at home.

In some cases, the worse harassment comes from your neighbors, and if your neighbors are engaging in harassment directed towards you, your family and your property, you need to take action.

Basically this means that if it was felt that a person of reasonable firmness (i.e.

the average person on the street) would not be alarmed or distressed by the behaviour, the offence is not committed.

Harassment is not necessarily something that goes away on its own, and it can have far-reaching effects that touch every aspect of your life.

If your neighbor is harassing you, consider some essential steps. One common form that harassment takes involves police agencies.However, all the circumstances of the incident will be taken into account when determining whether or not an offence has been committed.The law takes into account the "reasonable person" test.Harassment with fear of violence is a person whose cause of conduct causes another to fear on at least two occasions, that violence will be used against him/her and who knows that his/her behaviour will cause fear of violence on each of the occasions is guilty of an offence.The law still takes into account the "reasonable person" test when making a decision as to whether harassment with fear of violence has occurred. An attroney can help guide you through the process.