Students use relative dating principles to interpret the ages of rocks in a block diagram.

They then "date" samples from these rocks to test their relative age hypotheses.

numerical age dating geology-71

In order for a layer of material to be deposited, something has to be beneath it to support it.

It can't float in mid-air, particularly if the material involved is sand, mud, or molten rock.

A common form of criticism is to cite geologically complicated situations where the application of radiometric dating is very challenging.

These are often characterised as the norm, rather than the exception.

There is some ambiguity in the block diagram, so students must determine numerical ages for samples from the block diagram to test their relative age hypotheses.

Students "date" samples from the block diagram by counting the number of 235U and 207Pb atoms (colored beads) in a zircon (Ziploc bag).I thought it would be useful to present an example where the geology is simple, and unsurprisingly, the method does work well, to show the quality of data that would have to be invalidated before a major revision of the geologic time scale could be accepted by conventional scientists.Geochronologists do not claim that radiometric dating is foolproof (no scientific method is), but it does work reliably for most samples.In no way are they meant to imply there are no exceptions.For example, the principle of superposition is based, fundamentally, on gravity.The principle of superposition therefore has a clear implication for the age of a vertical succession of strata.