However this isn't always the case, even for new motherboards or laptops, and it's possible that you will have to create a bootable CD or USB drive and copy the files to that.

It’s important to get the full name as there are ususally subtly different versions.

Plus, you should note down the revision number – for example REV 1.03G as it may require a different BIOS file to previous revisions.

Sometimes you will need to update the BIOS in order for the motherboard to properly support a new processor or other hardware, or to fix bugs and improve stability or performance.

In most cases, nothing will go wrong at all, but it's important to know that there's an associated risk and not to treat the process too lightly.

If you have a laptop, you need only to find the make and exact model of the machine itself.

Identifying your BIOS version is easy: hold down the Windows key R to bring up the Run command prompt and type in msinfo32.

Typically you won't need to as a PC or laptop will be set up to look for a removable disc or drive before trying to boot from the hard drive.

Alternatively, look for a 'Press F10 for boot options' or similar as your computer is starting to bring up a list of drives.

You should be able to search for the model and see a list of available downloads, which might include manuals, drivers and BIOS files.

If a BIOS update is indeed among them, it‘s time to check the numbers: Did you type in the name of your mainboard correctly? And if so, does it state that your specific problem will be addressed in the documentation?

If you determine to flash BIOS, you are taking a personal risk of BIOS flash failure.