post 1700 AD, early Iron Age contexts, late glacial timescales) and when the relationship between the organic materials and the archaeological context is uncertain.The particular advantage of luminescence dating is that the method provides a date for the archaeological artefact or deposit itself, rather than for organic material in assumed association.Our standard cost for OSL dating is £550 VAT per sample but prices can vary depending on the nature and number of samples (see our schedule of charges).

A curve is generated for each aliquot (subsample), multiple aliquots are needed to obtain an accurate De. J., 1998, An introduction to optical dating: The dating of Quaternary sediments by the use of photon-stimulated luminescence: Oxford, University Press, 267 p.

Luminescence dating is particularly appropriate when radiocarbon dating is not possible (either where no suitable material is available or for ages beyond the radiocarbon age limit) or for applications affected by radiocarbon plateau effects (e.g.

| Calculating Age | Challenges for OSL | Case studies of OSL dating in glacial environments | References | Comments | Another way of dating glacial landforms is optically stimulated luminescence dating (OSL).

The OSL signal is reset by exposure to sunlight, so the signal is reset to zero while the sand is being transported (such as in a glacial meltwater stream).

The number of trapped electrons depends on the total amount of radiation that the mineral has been exposed to.

If we assume that the radiation dose rate of the sediment has remained constant over time, then if we measure that dose rate, we can calculate the sample age.

We are also able to conduct sample collection outside of the UK if the client is willing to cover additional transport, accommodation and subsistence costs.

Postgraduate students registered for a degree course within a UK university which does not house a luminescence laboratory may be eligible to apply for an award through a joint scheme set up with the Quaternary Research Association (

A certain percent of the freed electrons become trapped in defects or holes in the crystal lattice of the quartz sand grain (referred to as luminescent centers) and accumulate over time (Aitken, 1998).

In our laboratory, these sediments are exposed to an external stimulus (blue-green light) and the trapped electrons are released.

Likewise, projects central to the Laboratory's research interests may be carried out at a reduced charge.