The videos, ordered and paid for by pedophiles around the world, are broadcast live on the Internet.

As the US sought to affirm its commitment to transatlantic relations, Europeans felt it was time to back those words with action.

Discussions shifted from defense spending to the prospect of a "European way" of security.

The cybersex industry is a billion-dollar business worldwide.

And it is expanding in developing countries such as the Philippines, where more children are being abused due to rampant poverty and a growing cyber network.

Human rights groups estimate that tens of thousands of children in the Philippines alone are forced to perform sexual acts in Internet cafes or their homes.

Some families have started the cybersex business with only a laptop.

The psychological impact of cybersex is as damaging as in cases of physical abuse.

Many exploited children have to deal with anxiety and depression issues, and they cannot establish proper relations with other humans. Healing process "The children need to vent out negative emotions to regain self-confidence," Shay Cullen, founder of the PREDA child protection group, told DW.

In just ten weeks, more than 20,000 pedophiles contacted "Sweetie" from all over the world.