Charlemagne's army is fighting the Muslims in Spain.

dating translate french-86

Threatened by the might of Charlemagne's army of Franks, Marsile seeks advice and his wise man, Blancandrin, councils him to conciliate the Emperor, offering to surrender and giving hostages.

Accordingly, Marsile sends out messengers to Charlemagne, promising treasure and Marsile's conversion to Christianity if the Franks will go back to France.

If Roland continues to refuse, Oliver won't let Roland see his sister again whom Roland loves the most.

However, Archbishop Turpin intervenes and tells them that the battle will be fatal for all of them and so instructs Roland to blow his horn olifant (the word is an old alternative to "elephant", and was used to refer to a hunting horn made from an elephant tusk) to call for help from the Frankish army. Charlemagne and his noblemen gallop back even though Count Ganelon tries to trick them.

The Franks discover Ganelon's betrayal and keep him in chains until his trial, where Ganelon argues that his action was legitimate revenge, not treason.

While the council of barons assembled to decide the traitor's fate is initially swayed by this claim, one man, Thierry, argues that because Roland was serving Charlemagne when Ganelon delivered his revenge on him, Ganelon's action constitutes a betrayal.) is an epic poem based on the Battle of Roncevaux in 778, during the reign of Charlemagne.It is the oldest surviving major work of French literature and exists in various manuscript versions, which testify to its enormous and enduring popularity in the 12th to 14th centuries.This point is clearly expressed by Andrew Taylor, who notes, "[T]he Roland song was, if not invented, at the very least constructed.By supplying it with an appropriate epic title, isolating it from its original codicological context, and providing a general history of minstrel performance in which its pure origin could be located, the early editors presented a 4,002 line poem as sung French epic".Scholars estimate that the poem was written, possibly by a poet named Turold, between approximately 10, and most of the alterations were performed by about 1098.