American postcard tariffs: 1873: 1¢, with stamp pre-printed on the cards 1898: 1¢ 1952, 1 January: 2¢ 1958, 1 August: 3¢ 1963, 7 January: 4¢ 1968, 7 January: 5¢ 1971, 8 May: 6¢ 1974, 7 March: 8¢ 1975, 14 September: 7¢ 1975, 31 December: 9¢ 1978, 29 May: 10¢ 1981, 22 March: 12¢ 1981, 1 November: 13¢ 1985, 17 February: 14¢ 1988, 3 April: 15¢ 1991, 3 February: 19¢ 1995, 1 January: 20¢ 2001, 1 July: 21¢ 2002, 30 June: 23¢ 2006, 8 January: 24¢ For further information on French definitives, visit Marianne - a French national symbol, with French definitive stamps.French postcard tariffs: 1872: 10 centimes - journeying in the same town 15 ¢ - between two towns in France 1875, 26 October: 15 c 40 c - unfranked post card 1878, 1 May: 10 c - France 15 c - abroad • Local post card rate ended • The 15 centime rate lasted until 1917.

dating british postcards-23

(The first French postage stamp was issued on 1 January 1849.) This section is a train-spotter’s delight of lists of dates and accompanying postage rates.

It is best used as a reference section, rather than reading from beginning to end (unless, of course, you are a train-spotter type! Great Britain 1870 - 1918: ½d (one half-penny/one half-pence, hap’ny) apparently, postcard postage for overseas was 1d (one penny) 1918, 3 June: 1d 1921, 13 January: 1½d 1922, 24 May: 1d 1940, 1 May: 2d (letter 2½d) 1957, 1 October: 2½d (letter 3d) 1965, 17 May: 3d (letter 4d) 1968, 16 September: postage tariffs changed to first and second class.

First-class post should arrive the next day, second-class post taking longer. A postcard, at a weight of 3 grams, is well within the lowest postal rate, be it a half or a full ounce.

First: 5d; second: 4d After the conversion to decimal currency (100 p = £1, instead of 240 d = £1): 1971, 15 February - first: 3p, second: 2½p (6d) 1973, 10 September - first: 3½p, second: 3p 1974 24 June - first: 4½p, second: 3½p 1975, 17 March - first: 7p, second: 5½p 1975, 29 September - first: 8½p, second: 6½p 1977, 13 June - first: 9p, second: 7p 1979, 20 August - first: 10p, second: 8p 1980, 24 February - first: 12p, second: 10p 1981, 26 January - first: 14p, second: 11½p 1982, 1 February - first: 15½p, second: 12½p 1983, 5 April - first: 16p, second: 12½p 1984, 3 September - first: 17p, second: 13p 1985, 4 November - first: 17p, second: 12p 1986, 20 October - first: 19p, second: 14p 1989, 2 October - first: 20p, second: 15p 1990, 17 November- first: 22p, second: 17p 1991, 16 September- first: 24p, second: 18p 1993, 11 November- first: 25p, second: 19p 1996, 8 July - first: 26p, second: 20p 1999, 27 April - first: 26p, second: 19p 2000, 27 April - first: 27p, second: 19p 2003, 8 May - first: 28p, second: 20p 2004, 1 April- first: 28p, second: 21p 2005, 17 April- first: 30p, second: 21p Note: since 28 August 1989, when non-specific price-point stamps were first issued, senders more and more frequently use stamps denoted with 1 U. Thus, the postcard is given its own lower postal rate.

Old postcard collections interest collectors of antiques, memorabilia and ephemera; collectables such as old vintage postcards are used by museums and historians to document what was.

Before the age of photography, around 1839, look for engravings and illustrations.

1917, 1 January: 15 centimes Post card with less than 5 words: 10 c 1920, 1 April: 20 c 1926, 1 May: 30 c 1926, 9 August: 40 c 1937, 12 July: 55 c 1938, 17 November: 70 c 1939, 1 December: 80 c 1942, 5 January: 1 franc 20 centimes / 1.20 F 1945, 1 March: 1.50 F 1946, 1 January: 2.50 F , 3 January: 3.80 F 1947, 1 March: 3.50 F 1947, 8 July: 5 F 1948, 21 September: 8 F 1951, 8 December: 12 F 1957, 1 July: 15 F 1959, 6 January: 20 F • The franc was devalued 100-fold so 1 new franc = 100 old francs.

1960, 1 January: 20 centimes (the 1 January 1959 tariff expressed in new francs) 1965, 18 January: 25 c 1969, 13 January: 30 c • From 1971, 4 January: there are two tariffs - urgent and non-urgent.

The “paid-for by sender” postal system was developed by Rowland Hill.