But the bigger problem is that no profile can transmit the full essence of a human being.

research papers on online dating-70

Once, she met a man online who was a yoga enthusiast who owned the same books she did.

“We met in person, and there was actually no chemistry.” Online dating also differs from traditional courtship in that people get to know one another before they meet, trading e-mails and photos.

The advent of the Internet and inception of in 1995 prompted a sea change.

For a few years, online dating seemed like the bastion of the geeky and desperate, but the stigma passed. couples who formed relationships between 20, 22 percent of them met online, one academic study found.

This is especially good, the authors say, for those who might otherwise have a hard time meeting people — single parents, workaholics, those who are new in town, recently divorced or not heterosexual.

As one single man says in the report, “Where else can you go in a matter of 20 minutes, look at 200 women who are single and want to go on dates?

The nearly 200-page report, published Monday in the journal Psychological Science in the Public Interest, found that the main advantage that dating Web sites offer singles is access to a huge pool of potential partners.

“The problem is that the way online dating is implemented undermines some amount of its goodness.” People have always needed help looking for love.

When people exchanged e-mails for three weeks before meeting, the study says, they had a stronger attraction to their date in person, but if the correspondence went on for six weeks, the attraction level fell when they met.

“When it goes on too long you get too lofty an impression of what a person is like, or too particular,” Finkel says. “In the beginning, I had these long, flowery e-mail relationships, and then I met the person and it was like, ‘Oh, my God. ’ ” Now she meets men in person as soon as she can.

Similarly, the report says, “people become cognitively overwhelmed” as they scan dozens of profiles.